Pages

Friday, June 30, 2017

Down under what?

What the hell is that? Sounds like the howl of the wind in a box canyon. No, wait ... I know that sound. I think it's a distant didgeridoo. That's it, fellows - we have dug ourselves a tunnel to Australia.

Well, barely a day goes by here in the abandoned Cheney Hammer Mill without some kind of discovery. Last week it was a new source of precious reverb - a commodity rare as hen's teeth up here in central New York. Now we're looking at (or staring down into, I should say) a superhighway to down under. And when I say "down under", I don't mean merely down underground. Nay, sir ... I mean the actual land "Down Under", meaning the continent of Australia.

What luck, eh? Here I thought this elevator shaft to the center of the Earth would yield only another string of unsuccessful and unsatisfying performances in front of restive gaggles of Morlocks or some other troglodytic denizens of the dark. But now it seems the tunnel is a bit deeper than we thought ... like maybe twice as deep. Because you can just about see some light coming though from the other end, and it looks like Aussie sunlight. There's also a vague scent of flat beer. (Though I think that might be coming from Anti-Lincoln. He's been hitting the cache lately, and it shows.)

Then came MarvinWe could be wrong, of course. After all, one random strain of didgeridoo music does not a continent make. The only way to be certain is to send a emissary down there. It's a highly dangerous mission, so there's no way in hell that's going to be me. Matt's no stranger to danger, of course, but only in the context of helping birds, animals, and other living things. (Snowflake!) Then there's Marvin (my personal robot assistant). If he'd been around in 1969, NBC might have done a show about him called "Then came Marvin." He could have played a disillusioned android who starts riding a scooter around Minneapolis, then got canceled after two seasons.

Anywho, if we send Marvin down there and he comes up with an Aussie hat and a kangaroo's footprint on his brass, we'll know we hit Aussie paydirt. Sounds like a plan. Ish.

Sickness.

As I write this, the Senate Republicans have pulled their version of the ACA "repeal and replace" legislation - a bill that's really more a massive tax cut funded by massive cuts in Medicaid. This temporary hiatus is mostly down to the many thousands of people across the country who made their voices heard in various ways, and so to all of you I say job well done. That said, this job is not, in fact, done. The Republicans will be back very soon with a slightly amended version of the bill that can garner 50 votes, after having bought off key senators with part of that $300 billion-plus deficit reduction bundle built into this piece of legislative ordure. Just watch.

Two old men who will never need Medicaid.This entire situation - I won't say "debate" because there hasn't been any - is ridiculous largely because no one in Washington will admit to what the ACA's core problems are. The Republicans, and to a certain extent many Democrats, continue to insist that competition and a freer market in health insurance will deliver affordable coverage to everyone; just pull those sick people out of the system and into an underfunded high-risk pool, and the market can do its magic.

Bullshit. The "free market" approach to individual coverage doesn't work because individual health insurance is not a profitable line of business; insurers have known this for decades and have been pulling out of individual policies because they carry too much downside risk. They prefer large employer plans, where the only money being risked is that of the client company, not the insurer. Even if you start an individual health policy in good health, things inevitably go wrong and then the company is on the hook. Sure, they prefer younger, healthier folks as customers, but even they get cancer once in a while. Individual policies are not a money maker unless the market is so drastically tilted in the insurer's favor that they can basically sell nominal "coverage" to healthy people.

This is why Medicaid is such a popular program. Even the GOP's complaints about it all center on cost, not care. (They just see it as a cash cow.) Medicaid is not provided on market principles; neither is Medicare nor the veterans health program. No health insurance should be market-driven, because treating it like a commodity severely disadvantages poorer, older, and sicker people. Those categories apply to most everyone at some point in their lives. The only way to ensure that coverage will be there for all of us when we need it is single payer.

Last word: this Senate bill is sick; it is a tax cut scheme built on gutting Medicaid and pulling money from Medicare. And it will be back.

luv u,

jp